the work and personal site of Jared Alessandroni

Leap Piano

January 26th, 2013

piano

This is still in-progress, but getting there. My son and his friend came in and tried it – and they thought it was cool, so it must be somewhat. You can now play piano with the Leap – or, that is, a virtual keyboard with almost no control. I’m going to keep working on it, but it’s enough to know that while I’ll get some more accuracy out of it, the truth is it’s not going to get much more accurate using the methodology I’m working with – which isn’t to say it’s out of the realm of the leap to be that accurate – rather I have to really build some tighter JS to handle the math to do it right.
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LEAP Proof of Concept II

January 22nd, 2013

Check out my latest proof of concept here. This time, I use Canvas to parse the colors of a file (I’m putting an uploader in) that you can then practice tracing in the air. The idea being that for kinesthetic and for low-motor-skill developing learnings, this could be a powerful tool. I have gotten canvas to show the color at my “cursor,” though I still have to work through some alignment issues. Still in-progress!

Leap Proof of Concept Game

January 17th, 2013

game

It’s here! I’ve finished my first proof-of-concept.

Check it Out

So, to explain… Read the rest of this entry »

Time Warner Cable, NYC

January 17th, 2013

twc

Looking for Time Warner Cable on Yelp is NSFW – and for good reason. We hate Time Warner not just for what it is – terrible service by terrible people – but for why it is – the simple fact that there is no other option. It’s like having only one restaurant in town, no kitchen, no supermarket, and also the waiters spit on you when you sit down. Of course, that’s just in general. For the past few nights, my experience has been far worse.

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The Third Wave

January 9th, 2013

wave

 

I think it’s time to talk about the way we communicate with our computers. To do that, we need to look at the ways we have in the past. Forgetting about punch-cards and switches, I think it’s fair to look at the technology that most people recognize as input devices. Then, I want to look at what’s next – how do we interact with a computer in ten years. I believe that this is something that’s starting to take shape right now – and I like to call it the Third Wave.

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LEAPin’ Lizards

December 12th, 2012

leaplogo

 

Yessss! I was accepted into the LEAP developer program. My Leap Motion controller will be here in a few weeks! The Leap controller is really exciting – it allows you to use 3D interactions with your Mac, PC, or Linux box. I’m hoping to develop some educational apps for it.

Plain-Text

July 16th, 2012

One of the things I used to deal with as a data architect was, “Well, why can’t we just send them their password?” And the answer was always long and complex. Now, though, even my most neophyte clients understand the importance of data-level security. They no longer flinch when I say, Even though it has never happened to me ONCE I plan every database and every site as though it were going to be hacked tomorrow. And yes, I still have clients – or would-be clients – who say, Well, that’s not very secure. Well, no, it’s not. The internet, while not the den of snakes that it’s often portrayed as, is not very secure. And if you don’t plan for the worst, you’re not planning at all. Read the rest of this entry »

A Little History

July 11th, 2012

I heard, in the next room,
My son playing Für Elis on the piano.
Or piano-forte. But actually,
A Casio, which has
No hammers or pads –
Just a lonely black cord,
Connecting it to

The wall socket which runs
Copper down 16 floors
To a substation on 40th Street
Which channels the power,
From Canada,
Like a delta in the Hudson
Drips from the north making it to us.

History is like that,
Some of it even true,
Having flowed downstream
Swimming with
Rocks and Fish
Until it has a special taste,
An ironic freshness.

I want my son to feel,
Not just know,
The pluck of the harpsichord
Indefinite in dynamic, tinny,
Filling up the hall,
In the Medici court.
Just as Cristofori did.

I want him to be there,
Not just look at a picture,
With the men in the lab,
In the 1920s,
Working with vacuum tubes.
I fear the picture, thinking,
Everyone here is dead now.

From the piano to the tubes
To the Casio,
To the iPad he uses for sheet music,
The scope of history is both
Enormous and claustrophobic.
Our apartment stands in Native soil,
But was once a subterranean volcano.

Where does it end?

It makes me think of my son,
Supposed to be reading or
Playing or something else,
Standing suddenly in front of me
Arms open, ready for a hug.
Here, this is for you.

Someday I will be a picture
And the phrase will again be true.
Everyone in this picture
Is dead now.
As, I shudder at the thought,
Will he be.
And what will it matter?

That I was suddenly
If illogically,
Inspired to take him uptown to
the Met
Where they have an original
Cristofori piano,
Molded by his hands.

Will that memory mean,
Nothing
Or will it mean
A small drop of something,
Hundreds of years on.
What will he
What will I

Have created?
Everyone in this picture
Is dead.
But their ghosts,
Lying there with open arms,
Whisper, Here,
This is for you.

Polar Bears

June 15th, 2012

There are a lot of pictures online
Where else?
Of polar bears who
Tragically unawares,
Jumping onto the wrong sheet of ice,
Find themselves finally
Alone, in the middle of the ocean.

We might not remember
Or it might not matter
That the creates are vicious
Bloodthirsty predators
Their black eyes and big noses
And white fur
Make us want to love them.

So seeing them floating
Infinitely abandoned
As their world melts around them
As our world melts around them
Is horrifying
And it reminds us
That we are the predators.

But there was
A last trilobite.
And there was
A last dodo.
And there will be
Most certainly
A last human.

When I am clinging
To the last piece of ice,
I think about the polar bear and the dodo,
And you.
And I am thankful
I have the capacity
To know I am not alone.

Super Duper

May 18th, 2012

As John Cooper said on his FB posting, “This is one of the coolest “flash dances” ever! It’s 2012 and young people in Moscow have put on a “flash mob” happening, dancing to an 83-year-old American song written by a Russian-born American
Jew (Irving Berlin).” I’d add that all those people holding Korean tablets and wearing Australian boots and using Japanese cameras tell an even bigger story. We live in a small world. A small fucking awesome world.